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An Academician's Arsenal

By | December 14, 1987

NATIONAL SECURITY CONTROLS AND UNIVERSITY RESEARCH Information for Investigators and Administrators. Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C., 1987. 13 pp. Free. Selected Readings. 116 pp. Free. Statutes Regulations and Policy Statements. 225 pp. Out of stock but copies are available at most major institutions. National security control over scientific and technical information is characterized by the competing demands of national defense and academia’s freedom to com

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Biologist Urges Support For Saving the Tropics

By | December 14, 1987

SANTA ROSA NATIONAL PARK, COSTA RICA—Biologists must join the fight to save tropical species or face the loss within a generation of the edifice upon which bioscience is built, says an eminent tropical ecologist. “Many, many scientists don’t understand that if they’re not out there proselytizing for the maintenance, development and actual preservation of the systems they work on, some competitive force is going to take it away from them,” said Daniel Janzen, a

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Cuts Threaten Basic Research In Australia

By | December 14, 1987

SYDNEY—The Australian government’s increasingly pragmatic attitude toward academic research has dismayed many scientists here and reinforced their feeling that the universities’ central activities are under assault. Their concerns recently have focused on the Australian Research Grants Scheme (ARGS), the annual round of competitive grants for scientists and others at the country’s 20 universities. Total funding under ARGS for 1988 is $32.3 million Australian ($22 milli

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D

By | December 14, 1987

WASHINGTON—It’s hard to escape the dominance of Japan in worldwide technology, even if the subject is France. Gallic pride took a beating when its government asked American research administrators for their views on French technology. The U.S. executives said that France provides the United States with its stiffest competition in only two. categories—nuclear energy and aeronautics. The Japanese came out on top in a majority of the 11 categories, covering automobiles, comput

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By | December 14, 1987

LONDON—A consortium of four universities and three polytechnics in northwest England will host a new think tank aimed at improving Britain's ability to exploit its scientific research and development. The Centre for Exploitation of Science and Technology (CEST), funded by the government and private industry, is expected to remain independent of its academic hosts but conform to the standards of academe. Based in Manchester, it will maintain close links with all consortium members. CEST

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FDA Center Emphasizes Research

By | December 14, 1987

WASHINGTON—Ask Carl C. Peck of the Food and Drug Administration how important research is to his job, and he’ll simply point to the title of the center he heads. Peck is the first director of the FDA’s new Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. He said he has an “upfront agreement” with FDA Commissioner Frank E. Young to “bring research and training to a new level of legitimacy in this agency.” The result, he said, will be ‘an emphasis on scie

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Feminists Ask, Is Science Sexless?

By | December 14, 1987

SEX AND SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY Sandra Harding and Jean F. O’Barr, eds. The University of Chicago Press. Chicago, 1987. 304 pp. $10.95. Science has been regarded traditionally as sexless, and therefore removed from individual and institutional biases tha may influence less rigorous, more interpretive scholarly fields. How ever, as the papers in this volume demonstrate clearly, the assumption of gender neutrality in science is highly controversial. Indeed, as women have become increasingly a

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Forthcoming Books

December 14, 1987

ANIMAL SCIENCE The Natural History Reader in Animal Behavior. Howard Topoff ed. Columbia University Press December, 245 pp, $17 PB, $30 HB. Collection of articles from Natural History that discusses new research on animal behavior, including animal orientation and habitat selection. ASTRONOMY New Ideas in Astronomy: A Symposium Celebrating the Sixtieth Birthday of Halton C. Arp. Barry F. Madore, ed. Cambridge University. Press: December, 400 pp, $49.50. Explores the present state of the n

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Growing Up Saturated With Science

By | December 14, 1987

U my life I have been on the edges of science. At the start of the century, my father, J.S. Haldane, deeply engaged in the problem of alveolar air, probably didn’t notice that I was having fun on the lab floor, playing with blobs of mercury and occasionally licking them. I knew even then that science was important; and I was very proud of having small blood samples taken for some purpose. Later my brother, J.B.S. Haldane, and I discovered chemistry and made splendid volcanoes in the gard

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Happenings

December 14, 1987

Edward J. Poziomek, former director of research, U.S. Army Chemical Research at the Development and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., became Sigma Xi’s new executive director on December 1. Poziomek joined the society in 1961 and has served on the board of directors since 1976. His areas of research include surface chemistry, spectroscopy, physical-organic chemistry and organic synthesis. Charles E. Hammer Jr., associate vice president for health affairs and professor

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