Advertisement
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences

Magazine

Most Recent

Graham on SDI, Competitiveness

By | June 1, 1987

William R. Graham has directed the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy since Oct. 1, when the US. Senate approved his nomination to succeed George A. Keyworth II. Graham, whose background is largely in classified military systems research, had been serving as acting administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration when President Reagan named him science adviser. A strong supporter of Reagan's 1980 presidential bid, Graham advised him on defense policy issues bot

0 Comments

Happenings

June 1, 1987

The U.K. Advisory Council for Applied Research and Development has added five new appointees to its ranks. The 18-member ACARD reports to the government on the advancement of applied research and technology and the role of the United Kingdom in international scientific collaboration. In addition, the ACARD and the Advisory Board for Research Councils coordinate research supported through the Department of Education and Science. The new members are: Terry Harrison, chairman of Northern Engineerin

0 Comments

How to Boost Third World Science

By | June 1, 1987

Scientists in the Third World face many problems, not the least of which is funding. Of necessity, Third World nations cannot yet support science at levels commensurate with those of the developed nations. Meeting the basic needs of their citizens leaves the governments of developing countries with few resources to expend on long-term investment in the form of scientific research. So it often happens in the Third World that university and government research centers are understaffed, equipment i

0 Comments

Info Services for Chemical Regs

By | June 1, 1987

This Is second of two articles on keeping up with changes in chemical regulations. The first article, "How to Keep up With Chemical Regs" appeared In the May 18, 1987 issue of The Scientist, p. 18. Although newsletters attempt to keep one current, they are neither comprehensive nor do they provide what might be called an information base on which to build. For example, a newsletter is likely to mention the addition of a hazardous waste to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); it is

0 Comments

Koop Seeks Health Corps 'Uniformity'

By | June 1, 1987

WASHINGTON—Surgeon General C. Everett Koop's plan to "revitalize" the Public Health Service's commissioned corps has drawn the fire of researchers at the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. And the outcome of a May 18 NIH meeting designed to soothe them is not clear. "It looks like some of you came loaded for bear and weren't sure I was a bunny, so you shot anyway," Koop said following a series of pointed questions from the audience. Putting members back into

0 Comments

Letters

June 1, 1987

For his article "Shame on You, Mrs. Thatcher" (The Scientist, March 9, 1987, p. 9) Eugene Garfield deserves the gratitude of the British scientific community. His article, sympathetic to the impoverished state of British science, highlighting some of its failings, and proposing solutions to its problems, demands attention. It should be compulsory reading for scientists and politicians. Even Harvard humanities professors should be forced to study it. Yet, although Garfield has provided an accurat

0 Comments

NASA Plan's Critics Seek Smaller Module

By | June 1, 1987

PASADENA, CALIF—NASA's current plans for a space station are being challenged by advocates of a smaller station, more useful to scientists, that could be built more quickly and with fewer shuttle flights. This opposition has crystallized in recent weeks around two embattled figures: Peter Banks, the former chairman of NASA's task force on scientific uses of the space station, and Oliver P. Harwood, a senior engineer at Rockwell International. Banks, director of Stanford University's Space

0 Comments

New Semiannual Policy Journal

By | June 1, 1987

STI Review: No. 1. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Pans, 1986. $16 (£8) per issue; $30 (£15) for subscription. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) exists to promote consultation and coordination among Western bloc industrial nations. Examining trends and policy developments in scientific, technological and industrial arenas is an important part of the organization's activities. The OECD Secretariat collects statistical data and perfo

0 Comments

Postpone the SSC Decision For Two Years

By | June 1, 1987

There are several arguments against the Superconducting Supercollider that come from outside high-energy physics. High-energy physics, an exciting pioneer field in science, suffers from Big Science syndrome: it requires massive efforts in human and material resources to further the acquisition of knowledge. Meanwhile, areas systemic research show great promise with only moderate expenditure of resources. Huge potential breakthroughs in the principles of accelerator building (such as the superc

0 Comments

Report Urges European Technical Cooperation

By | June 1, 1987

LONDON—A new report on technical collaboration in Europe argues for its value to society but warns politicians that it cannot solve all their economic problems. "Do not regard collaboration as a panacea for all of Europe's, let alone the United Kingdom's, high-technology problems," write British researchers Margaret Sharp and Claire Shearman. "But support it, and support it wholeheartedly. Decisions about European initiatives for R&D should be taken on their own merits and not be subordina

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

  2. Antibody Alternatives
    Features Antibody Alternatives

    Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

  3. Holding Their Ground
    Features Holding Their Ground

    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

  4. Circadian Clock and Aging
    Daily News Circadian Clock and Aging

    Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies