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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | February 1, 2017

Intellectual property theft, gun violence, scientific failure, and more

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image: Pitcher Plant Enzymes Digest Gluten in Mouse Model

Pitcher Plant Enzymes Digest Gluten in Mouse Model

By | February 1, 2017

A newly discovered protease could break down grain proteins that trigger celiac disease.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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