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A test tube-based genome-labeling technique has been brought under the microscope.

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image: Newly Found White Blood Cell Withstands Chemotherapy

Newly Found White Blood Cell Withstands Chemotherapy

By | January 1, 2017

Vaccine-induced macrophages open a new realm of study into remodeling the immune system to reduce the risk of infections during cancer treatment.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Researchers Track Eels on Their Cross-Atlantic Migration

Researchers Track Eels on Their Cross-Atlantic Migration

By | January 1, 2017

A mysterious migration is coming to light after more than a century of study.

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image: RNA Sequences Don’t Predict In Vivo Transcript Structure

RNA Sequences Don’t Predict In Vivo Transcript Structure

By | January 1, 2017

Eukaryotes prevent secondary RNA structures called G-quadruplexes, commonly observed in vitro, from forming in the cell. 

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image: The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

The Sled Dogs that Stopped an Outbreak

By | January 1, 2017

Balto, Togo, and other huskies famously delivered life-saving serum to a remote Alaskan town in 1925—but newspapers didn’t tell the whole story. 

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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image: Forensics 2.0

Forensics 2.0

By | January 1, 2017

Meet the researchers working to untangle the mystery of a Missouri home filled with bones by bringing cutting-edge technologies into the crime lab.

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image: Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

Repurposing Existing Drugs for New Indications

By | January 1, 2017

An entire industry has sprung up around resurrecting failed drugs and recycling existing compounds for novel indications.

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