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image: Pushing the Limits

Pushing the Limits

By | February 1, 2015

A guide to the newest techniques for examining epigenetics in single cells

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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

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image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By | December 1, 2012

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every cancer—a finding he’s helping bring to the clinic.

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image: The Epigenetic Lnc

The Epigenetic Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Long non-protein-coding RNA (lncRNA) sequences are often transcribed from the opposite, or antisense, strand of a protein coding gene. In the past few years, research has shown that these lncRNAs play a number of regulatory roles in the cell. For exa

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image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

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image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

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image: Combing the Cancer Genome

Combing the Cancer Genome

By | March 1, 2012

A guided tour through the main online resources for analyzing cancer genomics data

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image: First, Do No Harm…

First, Do No Harm…

By | June 9, 2011

Is DNA damage an inevitable consequence of epigenetic reprogramming?

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image: Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

By | March 1, 2011

The study of how covalent marks on DNA and histones are involved in the origin and spread of cancer cells is also leading to new therapeutic strategies.

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