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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

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image: Stockpiling Histones

Stockpiling Histones

By | February 1, 2013

Histones stored on lipid droplets in fly embryos provide a backup supply when newly synthesized ones are lacking.

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image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By | December 1, 2012

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every cancer—a finding he’s helping bring to the clinic.

5 Comments

image: The Epigenetic Lnc

The Epigenetic Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Long non-protein-coding RNA (lncRNA) sequences are often transcribed from the opposite, or antisense, strand of a protein coding gene. In the past few years, research has shown that these lncRNAs play a number of regulatory roles in the cell. For exa

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image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

image: Flu Fights Dirty

Flu Fights Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Mimicking a host-cell histone protein offers flu a sneaky tactic to suppress immune response.

1 Comment

image: DNA, Contortionist

DNA, Contortionist

By | August 1, 2012

The DNA forms known as G-quadruplexes are finally discovered in human cells.

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image: Combing the Cancer Genome

Combing the Cancer Genome

By | March 1, 2012

A guided tour through the main online resources for analyzing cancer genomics data

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image: Deep Tissue Treatment

Deep Tissue Treatment

By | September 1, 2011

A new, genetically encoded tag for electron microscopy may revolutionize studies of specific proteins in cells and tissues.

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