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image: The Footprints of Winter

The Footprints of Winter

By | March 1, 2011

Epigenetic marks laid down during the cold months of the year allow flowering in spring and summer.

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image: Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

Epigenetic Changes in Cancer

By | March 1, 2011

The study of how covalent marks on DNA and histones are involved in the origin and spread of cancer cells is also leading to new therapeutic strategies.

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The Mark of Faith

By | March 1, 2011

Testing a central tenet of epigenetic regulation

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image: Epigenetics—A Primer

Epigenetics—A Primer

By | March 1, 2011

There are many ways that epigenetic effects regulate the activation or repression of genes. Here are a few molecular tricks cells use to read off the right genetic program.

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image: Environmental Impact

Environmental Impact

By | March 1, 2011

Research in behavioral epigenetics is seeking evidence that links experience to biochemistry to gene expression and back out again.

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image: Proteins Adorned

Proteins Adorned

By | January 1, 2011

Cracking the Secrets of Posttranslational Modifications

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