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October 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2012 issue of The Scientist.


image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.


image: Mission: Possible

Mission: Possible

By | October 1, 2012

Cooperation, not competition, is the way forward.

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image: The Epigenetic Lnc

The Epigenetic Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Long non-protein-coding RNA (lncRNA) sequences are often transcribed from the opposite, or antisense, strand of a protein coding gene. In the past few years, research has shown that these lncRNAs play a number of regulatory roles in the cell. For exa


image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.


image: Flu Fights Dirty

Flu Fights Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Mimicking a host-cell histone protein offers flu a sneaky tactic to suppress immune response.

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image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism


image: Evolution, Tout de Suite

Evolution, Tout de Suite

By | October 1, 2011

Epigenetic perturbations could jump-start heritable variation.


image: The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

The Human Genome Project, Then and Now

By | October 1, 2011

An early advocate of the sequencing of the human genome reflects on his own predictions from 1986.


image: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

Beyond Nature vs. Nurture

By | October 1, 2011

Researchers studying differences in how individuals respond to stress are finding that genes are malleable and environments can be deterministic.


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