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Big ocean, small RNAs

By | May 13, 2009

The open ocean is teeming with microbial small RNAs that regulate a multitude of environmental processes ranging from carbon metabolism to nutrient acquisition, according to a linkurl:paper;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v459/n7244/abs/nature08055.html published in tomorrow's (May 14) issue of __Nature__. Particle traps like these were usedto collect water column samplesImage: SOEST/University of Hawaii"What makes this study quite exciting is the access to novel and previously unidentifie

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Blood grows when it flows

By | May 13, 2009

The physical forces exerted by a heart beat and the blood flow it produces trigger the formation of new blood cells, according to two studies published today (May 13) in Nature and Cell. Cluster of blood cells developing afterexposure to shear stressImage: Luigi Adamo, Ph.D. student inthe García-Cardeña lab at Harvard"It's very exciting work," said embryologist linkurl:Mary Dickinson;http://www.bcm.edu/db/db_fac-dickinson.html at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who was not in

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Animal suppliers stay afloat

By | May 12, 2009

Strong sales to academic researchers are helping companies that provide mice, rats, and other model organisms for research weather the global economic crisis, despite a downturn in demand from pharma and biotech. Image: Understanding Animal Research/Wellcome ImagesAt the linkurl:Jackson Laboratory,;http://www.jax.org/ a non-profit mouse supplier in Bar Harbor, Maine, overall demand is down by "single digits," Auro Nair, associate general manager of linkurl:JAX Mice & Services,;http://jaxmice.ja

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Primate lab slapped by USDA

By | May 12, 2009

Federal investigators have confirmed reports of primate mistreatment at the largest primate research facility in the US. As __The Scientist__ linkurl:reported;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55490/ in early March, the New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana drew criticism after a video of alleged animal abuse surfaced. The video was shot by an investigator with the Humane Society of the United States, who in 2007 and 2008 recorded images of chimps being sedated with dart guns and fall

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A new epigenetic cancer

By | May 11, 2009

Researchers have discovered a new category of cancer caused by chromatin recognition gone awry. An aberrant protein that binds to activated DNA-winding proteins drives up gene expression leading to unchecked cell growth, according to a linkurl:study;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nature08036.html published online yesterday (May 10) in __Nature__. Chromatin wound on histone proteinsImage: Eric Smith, DFCISeveral forms of the blood cancer linkurl:acute myeloid leukemia;htt

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Journals speed up flu studies

By | May 11, 2009

Many top tier science journals are going into overdrive to publish data about the emerging swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus epidemic, compressing what is often a multi-month process into just a few days or weeks. Influenza virusImage: National High Magnetic Field Laboratory,Florida State UniversityAn international research team led by linkurl:Neil Ferguson;http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/people/neil.ferguson/ of Imperial College London published a linkurl:report;http://www.sciencemag.

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NIH finally takes on conflicts

By | May 11, 2009

After several months of intense scrutiny, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is considering stricter rules on managing financial conflicts among its grantees. The research and funding body put out a call for comments on changing the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) conflict of interest rules via an linkurl:entry;http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9-10666.pdf in the Federal Register on Friday (May 8). The rules under consideration would involve all applicants for funding f

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Elsevier published 6 fake journals

By | May 7, 2009

Scientific publishing giant Elsevier put out a total of six publications between 2000 and 2005 that were sponsored by unnamed pharmaceutical companies and looked like peer reviewed medical journals, but did not disclose sponsorship, the company has admitted. Elsevier is conducting an "internal review" of its publishing practices after allegations came to light that the company produced a pharmaceutical company-funded publication in the early 2000s without disclosing that the "journal" was corp

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Home of immune memory found

By | May 7, 2009

New findings overturn a major model of where immune memory is stored. Rather than circulating throughout the body, as researchers had thought, memory T-cells actually reside in a comfortable niche in the bone marrow waiting for the next chance to fight infection, according to a linkurl:new article;http://www.cell.com/immunity/abstract/S1074-7613(09)00187-3 published online in __Immunity__ today (May 7th). "It's very exciting data," said Antonio Lanzaveccia from the Institute for Research in B

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New protein offers inside view

By | May 7, 2009

New labeling proteins that fluoresce in the infrared spectrum allow scientists to see deep inside the body of living mammals without lifting a scalpel, according to a study published in Science tomorrow (May 8). Image: Xiaokun Shu, UCSD Researchers in the lab of linkurl:Roger Tsien,;http://www.tsienlab.ucsd.edu/ who received the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in the development of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to label tissue, have now come up with a new marker, called infrared-f

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