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The regenerative heart

By | October 13, 2008

A diseased mammalian embryonic heart boosts its production of heart muscle cells to spur its own regeneration, according to a linkurl:study;http://www.developmentalcell.com/content/article/abstract?uid=PIIS1534580708003882 appearing tomorrow in Developmental Cell. "The mammalian heart has a phenomenal capacity to fix itself," linkurl:Timothy Cox;http://depts.washington.edu/chdd/iddrc/res_aff/cox.html at the University of Washington, the study's lead author, told The Scientist, "which is importa

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A match made in open access heaven?

By | October 10, 2008

Will BioMed Central, the publishing house that's been the flagship for open access for nearly a decade, be in good hands with Springer? Yes, say some open access advocates, as long as the BioMed Central (BMC) publishing model is allowed to persevere. Indeed, the linkurl:acquisition this week;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55074/ of BMC by Springer may send the signal to other commercial groups that open access works. "I think it's a good sign for open access," Heather Joseph, execut

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GFP scientists win 2008 chemistry Nobel

By | October 8, 2008

The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to a trio of researchers who discovered, expressed, and developed green fluorescent protein (GFP) and revolutionized the way that biologists visualize living cells. Osamu Shimomura discovered GFP in the jellyfish __Aequorea victoria__ in 1962 while working at Princeton University, Martin Chalfie of Columbia University first expressed the protein in __E. coli__ and __C. elegans__ in the early 1990s, and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Die

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Green team wins 2008 Nobel

By | October 8, 2008

Three researchers who were instrumental in discovering and developing green florescent protein (GFP), which revolutionized how biologists observe the functioning of living cells, have won the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. linkurl:Osamu Shimomura,;http://www.conncoll.edu/ccacad/zimmer/GFP-ww/shimomura.html now at the Marine Biological Institute in Woods Hole, MA, linkurl:Martin Chalfie,;http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/faculty/chalfie/ a Columbia University cell biologist, and linkurl:Roger T

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New parasite genomes for malaria

By | October 8, 2008

More than linkurl:six years;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/13395/ after researchers sequenced the genome of the most virulent human malaria parasite, researchers now report the sequences of two more species, according to a pair of studies published in Nature this week. By comparing the genetics of Plasmodium falciparum to that of the newly sequenced species, P. knowlesi, and linkurl:P. vivax;, the two teams have begun to identify the different mechanisms by which each species max

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Stem cells emerge at night

By | October 8, 2008

Stem cells undergo circadian cycles in humans, emerging from the bone marrow into the bloodstream at higher concentrations at night than in the day, according to a report in __Cell Stem Cell__ linkurl:this week.;http://www.cellstemcell.com/ The study suggests that a simple change in hospital procedures could significantly increase stem cell yield for therapy. "We can take advantage of [the findings] if we coordinate our clinical practices" to harvest stem cells for cancer patients late in the

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Animal suffering: unknowable?

By | October 7, 2008

Researchers in the UK should report more details than they currently do about how much their lab animals are suffering, according to recent recommendations by a UK working group. But one prominent pain researcher thinks such requirements are useless. Last week, a working group made up of research scientists, veterinary surgeons, and animal care technicians, representing the Animal Procedures Committee and Lab Animals Science Association, released a report calling for more stringent reporting o

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BioMed Central sold to Springer

By | October 7, 2008

The world's largest open access publisher, BioMed Central, has been sold to Springer. BioMed Central (a former sister company of The Scientist) publishes 180 peer-reviewed journals under the open access publishing model, meaning that anyone can read articles for free once they are published, and authors pay a per-page fee to publish in the journals. There are no plans to change the journal publishing costs or fees, Matt McKay, director of public relations at BioMed Central, told The Scientist.

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Guilty: stem cell researcher

By | October 7, 2008

A former member of a high profile stem cell biology research team at the University of Minnesota has been found guilty of falsifying data, a university investigatory panel has ruled. Morayma Reyes, a former PhD student in the lab of prominent stem cell biologist linkurl:Catherine Verfaillie,;http://www.kuleuven.be/cv/u0048658e.htm was under investigation by the university for fabricating data in a linkurl:2002 Nature paper;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?orig_db=PubMed&db=pubmed&cmd=Se

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Stem cell biotech stays afloat

By | October 7, 2008

Embryonic stem cell biotech company linkurl:Advanced Cell Technology;http://www.advancedcell.com/ (ACT), announced today (Oct. 7) that it will be selling off $500,000 in convertible bonds in the next three months, following the company's linkurl:disclosure;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54884/ this summer that it was experiencing financial troubles. The Massachusetts-based company told linkurl:__Mass High Tech__;http://www.masshightech.com/stories/2008/10/06/daily29-Advanced-Cell-Tec

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