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Animal suffering: unknowable?

By | October 7, 2008

Researchers in the UK should report more details than they currently do about how much their lab animals are suffering, according to recent recommendations by a UK working group. But one prominent pain researcher thinks such requirements are useless. Last week, a working group made up of research scientists, veterinary surgeons, and animal care technicians, representing the Animal Procedures Committee and Lab Animals Science Association, released a report calling for more stringent reporting o

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BioMed Central sold to Springer

By | October 7, 2008

The world's largest open access publisher, BioMed Central, has been sold to Springer. BioMed Central (a former sister company of The Scientist) publishes 180 peer-reviewed journals under the open access publishing model, meaning that anyone can read articles for free once they are published, and authors pay a per-page fee to publish in the journals. There are no plans to change the journal publishing costs or fees, Matt McKay, director of public relations at BioMed Central, told The Scientist.

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Guilty: stem cell researcher

By | October 7, 2008

A former member of a high profile stem cell biology research team at the University of Minnesota has been found guilty of falsifying data, a university investigatory panel has ruled. Morayma Reyes, a former PhD student in the lab of prominent stem cell biologist linkurl:Catherine Verfaillie,;http://www.kuleuven.be/cv/u0048658e.htm was under investigation by the university for fabricating data in a linkurl:2002 Nature paper;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?orig_db=PubMed&db=pubmed&cmd=Se

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Stem cell biotech stays afloat

By | October 7, 2008

Embryonic stem cell biotech company linkurl:Advanced Cell Technology;http://www.advancedcell.com/ (ACT), announced today (Oct. 7) that it will be selling off $500,000 in convertible bonds in the next three months, following the company's linkurl:disclosure;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54884/ this summer that it was experiencing financial troubles. The Massachusetts-based company told linkurl:__Mass High Tech__;http://www.masshightech.com/stories/2008/10/06/daily29-Advanced-Cell-Tec

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Emory psychiatrist steps down

By | October 6, 2008

Renowned psychiatrist Charles Nemeroff stepped down from his position as chairman of the psychiatry department at Emory University on Friday (Oct. 3) amid accusations that he's failed to disclose hundreds of thousands of dollars in pharmaceutical company payouts while receiving millions of dollars in federal research funding. Nemeroff's apparent lack of disclosure is being probed by Senator linkurl:Charles Grassley;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54832/ (R-IA) from his perch as the ra

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This year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine will be shared by three researchers who identified two viruses that have had crucial impacts on human health. Harald zur Hausen of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg will be honored for his work in the 1970s identifying the human papilloma viruses and their role in cervical cancer. Francoise Barre-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur, and Luc Montagnier, co-founder of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, will share the

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HPV, HIV researchers nab 2008 Nobel

By | October 6, 2008

Francoise Barré-Sinoussi of the Institut Pasteur in Paris and Luc Montagnier, cofounder and director of the World Foundation for AIDS Research and Prevention, have won the 2008 Nobel in Physiology or Medicine for their the discovery of HIV. Harald zur Hausen of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg also received the prize for his work identifying the human papilloma viruses and their role in cervical cancer. According to the Nobel Prize Committee, Barré-Sinoussi and Montagnie

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Red fish, blue fish, speciation?

By | October 2, 2008

Capturing the eye of a potential mate is the first step in propagating a species. But can the way a female sees males of a certain color lead a single species of fish to split into linkurl:two?;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/14251/ A study published this week in Nature suggests two species of cichlid fish -- one red and one blue -- may have arisen from the female mating preference for males she is best able to see. "We've wanted since Darwin to understand how species originate,

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HIV's time of origin confirmed

By | October 1, 2008

Analysis of a newly-identified 48-year-old tissue sample from a woman infected with linkurl:HIV;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53516/ has confirmed that the virus emerged in the early 20th century, researchers report today in Nature. By comparing the differences between the sequence of this sample from 1960, the second-oldest ever found, and that of a 1959 sample identified a decade ago, linkurl:Michael Worobey;http://eebweb.arizona.edu/Faculty/Bios/worobey.html of the Universit

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Place your 2008 Nobel bets

By | October 1, 2008

Predicting who will win Nobel Prizes is a tricky business. The Nobel committees' nomination and selection processes are cloaked in mystery. Each year, though, a couple brave organizations try their luck. One of these is Thomson Reuters, which has linkurl:released;http://scientific.thomsonreuters.com/nobel/essay/ a list of Nobel picks every year since 2002. Thomson bases its picks largely on the citation data that ISI - a part of Thomson Scientific founded by __The Scientist__ founder linkurl:Eu

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