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Goodbye to LD50?

By | January 9, 2008

Drug companies should stop using a classic toxicity test, lethal dose 50 (LD50), to inform clinical trials, according to authors in an upcoming journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology linkurl:report.;http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6WPT-4R8WK2M-1-1&_cdi=6999&_user=10&_orig=browse&_coverDate=12%2F05%2F2007&_sk=999999999&view=c&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkWW&md5=db03ae20cfcfde5f302c238ad0633bbc&ie=/sdarticle.pdf Mouse data of a drug's LD50, the dose of a drug that kills 50%

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Elsevier gets spammed

By | January 8, 2008

Anyone get an Email that looks like it's from Elsevier, asking for papers? Only, it's not really Elsevier, and you shouldn't click on any of the links. The Email, entitled "Elsevier: Building insights; breaking boundaries" and signed by Peter Throwher (Prof.), asks researchers to submit manuscripts in "all fields of human Endeavor." The message is quite bizarre in spots. "Papers submitted will be sorted out and published in any of our numerous journals that best

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New networking site for scientists

By | January 8, 2008

There's a new kid on the ever-growing virtual bock of social networking websites. Last year I wrote about how scientists might use these linkurl:sites;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53233/ to optimize their impact in the scientific community, and a new social networking website geared specifically toward life scientists is set to go live this month. linkurl:BioMedExperts.com;http://www.biomedexperts.com/ compiles information about authors whose research papers appear on PubMed, s

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Pygmy rabbits may get reprieve

By | January 8, 2008

For those of you cheering the linkurl:pygmy rabbit, ;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/53232/ you can let up a restrained cheer today - a small one, perhaps, in keeping with the size of the animals. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), bowing to a linkurl:September court order, ;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53716/ is reconsidering whether more members of the tiny species should be covered under the Endangered Species Act. The agency had previously denied coverage of

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Clocking monarch migration

By | January 7, 2008

Researchers have uncovered key genetic mechanisms underlying one of the most impressive feats of animal linkurl:migration;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53974/# on Earth: the autumnal voyage of monarch butterflies from eastern North America to distant Mexican fir forests. In this week's issue of __PLoS Biology__, neurobiologist linkurl:Steven Reppert;http://www.umassmed.edu/neuroscience/faculty/reppert.cfm?start=0 and colleagues from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and

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Publishers object to OA mandate

By | January 4, 2008

The new mandate that requires NIH-funded researchers to make their published papers publicly available threatens publisher and author interests, according to a linkurl:statement;http://www.pspcentral.org/publications/AAP_press_release_NIH_mandatory_policy.pdf released yesterday (January 3) by the Association of American Publishers (AAP). The mandate was signed into law by the president on December 26 as part of the 2008 appropriations bill, which went through many linkurl:iterations;http://www.

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Reviewer rewards from the NIH

By | January 4, 2008

In an effort to keep good peer reviewers coming back, the National Institutes of Health is letting "permanent" reviewers, who typically serve for four years on chartered study sections, submit their own R01, R21, and R34 grant applications at any time, disregarding standard deadlines. NIH spokesman Don Luckett told me the agency decided to adopt the change after receiving feedback from long-term reviewers that their service put them at a disadvantage by requiring them to review applications whi

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Science vs. science

By | January 3, 2008

It's the first day of voting today in Iowa, and a perfect time to talk about...science? So says a linkurl:group of scientists;http://www.sciencedebate2008.com/www/index.php?id=2 who have joined Sciencedebate2008, now urging the candidates for US president to linkurl:debate their stance;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/12/1/22/1/ on the environment, medicine, and science policy. This debate is vital, they argue, "given the many linkurl:urgent scientific and technological challenges;http://www.

4 Comments

Blakemore denied Sir - again

By | January 2, 2008

In case you missed this over the holiday, former Medical Research Council head Colin Blakemore was denied knighthood by the UK, where news reports have attributed the decision to his support of animal research. In 2003, Blakemore was also linkurl:denied knighthood;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21915/ for a similar reason. The snub smarts, especially since the chief of the MRC would normally automatically be granted a knighthood. That year, Blakemore threatened to resign as MRC he

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Still no bioterror work at Texas A&M

By | January 2, 2008

Research on bioterrorist agents at Texas A&M University is linkurl:still suspended;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/53600/ due to breaches in biosafety practices, although the university said last year it expected to be cleared to continue such work by the end of 2007. "The program continues to be on hold," Sherylon Carroll of the university's press office told The Scientist. "We are waiting for feedback from the Centers for Disease Control." The CDC suspended the university's bioterro

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