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Flooding disclosed at virus lab

By | November 3, 2008

A linkurl:pathogen lab;http://www.vet.uga.edu/ahrc/index.php at the University of Georgia which aims to work with viruses such as SARS and avian influenza has been temporarily closed after two flooding incidents this fall. The first flood occurred on September 24 during the first of a series of studies on a cattle virus called vesicular stomatitis, according to the linkurl:Atlanta Journal Constitution.;http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories//2008/11/02/lab_1102_2DOT.html?cxntlid=homepa

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Dr. Chocolate

By | October 31, 2008

With Halloween upon us, youngsters and adults alike will enjoy a night of regret-free linkurl:chocolate;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/20546/ bingeing. But how much do you really know about the sweet substance? If you're Stefan Bernhard, you can safely say you've made a lifetime study of the elixir of the gods. At a recent meeting of the linkurl:Experimental Cuisine Collective(ECC);http://experimentalcuisine.googlepages.com/ at New York University, Bernhard, professor of chemistry

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Santa Fe Institute hits hard times

By | October 31, 2008

The linkurl:Santa Fe Institute;http://www.santafe.edu/ (SFI), a 24-year-old collaborative research center in New Mexico, is tightening its belt in anticipation of continued market instability and a curtailment in donations to support its work. Physicist and SFI director linkurl:Geoffrey West;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/52865/ told __The Scientist__ that, while the budget of the institute is in no immediate danger of evaporating, administrators there thought it prudent to freeze

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Ancient iceman has no modern kin

By | October 30, 2008

The 5,000-year-old mummy Öetzi, found in a glacier in the European alps 17 years ago and believed to be an ancestor of modern Europeans, actually belonged to a different genetic family and may have no living descendants, researchers report today in Current Biology. The researchers sequenced linkurl:mitochondrial DNA;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/19318/(mtDNA) extracted from Öetzi's intestines, offering the oldest complete mtDNA sequence of modern humans. "We sort of ass

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Deadly bat fungus fingered

By | October 30, 2008

The mysterious disease has been linkurl:ravaging bat populations;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/55031/ in the northeastern US appears to be caused by a previously undescribed species of a common fungus, according to research published today (Oct. 30) in __Science__. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fungal infection that has killed 75% of some bat populations in Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, and Connecticut since it was first discovered in a cave in upstate New York in 2006. Thou

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Biotech faces investment downturn

By | October 29, 2008

Venture capital investment in the linkurl:biotechnology;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15304/ sector appears to be one bright spot in an otherwise gloomy snapshot of the financial climate, according to recent data. But a strong third quarter belies a likely downtrend in biotech investment over the next couple quarters. According to PricewaterhouseCoopers' quarterly linkurl:MoneyTree Report,;https://www.pwcmoneytree.com/MTPublic/ns/nav.jsp?page=notice&iden=B which was released earl

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Lab weathers storms, not concerns?

By | October 29, 2008

A high-security pathogen lab in Galveston, Texas, survived the hurricane that hit the region last month, but is now the focus of safety concerns plaguing biosafety research of late. Galveston is an island often hit by hurricanes. Ike, which hit in September, caused more than $700 million in damage to the University of Texas facilities there, about $18 million of that to research labs, Nature linkurl:reported.;http://www.nature.com/news/2008/081022/full/4551012a.html But the pathogen lab escaped

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More pharma jobs on the block?

By | October 29, 2008

Pharma giant Wyeth announced plans yesterday to eliminate research in half of its disease research areas. The company has not yet said what, if any, jobs will be cut in the process. A handful of other linkurl:pharmaceutical companies;http://www.the-scientist.com/2007/2/1/42/1/ have recently narrowed their research focus in response to linkurl:sluggish sales and the growing cost;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54972/ of drug development. Wyeth in particular has suffered from the lo

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Editor sorry for drug cost article

By | October 27, 2008

The Web site of the student-run Harvard Health Policy Review is up and running after about a week of mysterious down time, and the journal's editor has apologized for running a controversial article without proper bias screening. linkurl:Rumors;http://www.gooznews.com/archives/001223.html circulated last week when the Review Web site was down that Harvard authorities had censored the publication of the article, which addressed a long-standing debate about the total cost for developing a drug, f

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German monkey studies nixed

By | October 27, 2008

Local lawmakers in Bremen, Germany, are refusing to renew a prominent neuroscientist's license to conduct research on primates, despite the fact that his research was approved by a national regulatory body. The University of Bremen researcher, linkurl:Andreas Kreiter,;http://www.neuro.uni-bremen.de/~brain/staff/eak.htm works with 24 macaques to measure neuronal firing as part of his studies into cognition in the mammalian brain. During local elections last year, the regional parliament, in resp

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