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Invitrogen and AB postpone merger

By | October 15, 2008

The sharp downturn in markets over recent weeks is delaying a final shareholder vote on the linkurl:merger;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54747/ of biotech companies linkurl:Invitrogen;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/18238/ and linkurl:Applied Biosystems;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15680/ (ABI). The delay "is a direct consequence of the dramatic drop in share prices across the board since June," Peter Dworkin, vice president of investor relations and cor

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Single neuron power

By | October 15, 2008

Training the brain to control a single neuron 's activation could restore motion in paralyzed limbs, according to a study to be published tomorrow in linkurl:__Nature.__;http://www.nature.com/news/2008/081015/full/news.2008.1170.html The study represents a novel approach for developing neuroprosthetics. "This paper demonstrates that simple methods can be very useful," said Leigh Hochberg, a clinician and researcher at Brown University and other institutions, who was not involved with the study.

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Slow sensing ages stem cells

By | October 15, 2008

Adult stem cells become slower at dividing as they age because they get less efficient at sensing their microenvironment, according to a study to be published in Nature tomorrow. The findings suggest a mechanism to explain why production of adult stem cells such as sperm drops as an organism gets older. "I think this is a fantastic piece of work that begins to explain" how adult stem cells age, said linkurl:Leanne Jones,;http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/faculty/jonesl.html a stem cell biologist at

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BU biolab ups security plans

By | October 14, 2008

The recent linkurl:suicide;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54907/ of microbiologist Bruce Ivins, pegged by the US government as the culprit in a spate of deadly anthrax mailings in 2001, is already spurring a boost in linkurl:security procedures;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/53626/ and screening at labs working on deadly pathogens. Boston University's biolab, a controversial high-security facility under construction in the city's South End neighborhood, plans to vet prosp

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NIH $ frozen amid conflict probe

By | October 14, 2008

An Emory University psychiatrist under investigation by a Senate committee for allegedly failing to disclose more than a million dollars in pharmaceutical company pay has stepped down as principal investigator on a $9.3 million National Institutes of Health research grant. The researcher, Charles Nemeroff, is the linkurl:second;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54935/ scientist who has recently stepped down from an NIH grant amid Senate scrutiny of undisclosed conflicts of interest. Ac

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Trouble for deCODE

By | October 14, 2008

Iceland biotech linkurl:deCODE Genetics;http://www.the-scientist.com/2008/4/1/20/1/ is taking a hit from the global financial downswing. The company's stock price has plunged 54% since September to $0.45 a share. According to NASDAQ's s regulations, companies must keep their share prices over $1. DeCODE dipped below $1 on September 10, and has 180 days to bounce back to maintain a NASDAQ listing. (The company's net worth, $27.88 million, puts it above the $5 million -- not $50 million, as lin

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The regenerative heart

By | October 13, 2008

A diseased mammalian embryonic heart boosts its production of heart muscle cells to spur its own regeneration, according to a linkurl:study;http://www.developmentalcell.com/content/article/abstract?uid=PIIS1534580708003882 appearing tomorrow in Developmental Cell. "The mammalian heart has a phenomenal capacity to fix itself," linkurl:Timothy Cox;http://depts.washington.edu/chdd/iddrc/res_aff/cox.html at the University of Washington, the study's lead author, told The Scientist, "which is importa

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A match made in open access heaven?

By | October 10, 2008

Will BioMed Central, the publishing house that's been the flagship for open access for nearly a decade, be in good hands with Springer? Yes, say some open access advocates, as long as the BioMed Central (BMC) publishing model is allowed to persevere. Indeed, the linkurl:acquisition this week;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55074/ of BMC by Springer may send the signal to other commercial groups that open access works. "I think it's a good sign for open access," Heather Joseph, execut

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GFP scientists win 2008 chemistry Nobel

By | October 8, 2008

The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry will go to a trio of researchers who discovered, expressed, and developed green fluorescent protein (GFP) and revolutionized the way that biologists visualize living cells. Osamu Shimomura discovered GFP in the jellyfish __Aequorea victoria__ in 1962 while working at Princeton University, Martin Chalfie of Columbia University first expressed the protein in __E. coli__ and __C. elegans__ in the early 1990s, and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Die

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Green team wins 2008 Nobel

By | October 8, 2008

Three researchers who were instrumental in discovering and developing green florescent protein (GFP), which revolutionized how biologists observe the functioning of living cells, have won the 2008 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. linkurl:Osamu Shimomura,;http://www.conncoll.edu/ccacad/zimmer/GFP-ww/shimomura.html now at the Marine Biological Institute in Woods Hole, MA, linkurl:Martin Chalfie,;http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/faculty/chalfie/ a Columbia University cell biologist, and linkurl:Roger T

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