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Epigenetics and the heart

By | February 20, 2006

Epigenetics and chromatin remodeling, it turns out, may play a role in heart disease. In one of two keynote addresses that opened the Keystone Symposia?s meeting on Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiac Disease and Regeneration here in Santa Fe, New Mexico, linkurl:Eric Olson;http://hamon.swmed.edu/faculty/olson2001.html showed why he?s received a number of awards from the American Heart Association, and why one of his earlier papers, linking calcineurin to cardiac hypertrophy, was a linkurl:Hot Paper

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More Korean research problems

By | February 16, 2006

In the latest of a long line of developments, Columbia University appears to have withdrawn its name from a linkurl:2001 study;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=11584476&query_hl=7&itool=pubmed_docsum in the Journal of Reproductive Medicine co-authored by Korean researcher Kwang Yul Cha. During the study, prayer appeared to boost the success of in vitro fertilization (IVF), even though infertile couples weren?t aware of the intervention.

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Victories and Warnings for Evolution

By | February 15, 2006

So the Ohio School Board overturned a previous decision to add wording about ?critical analysis? of evolutionary theory. Though the wording sounds somewhat innocuous several evolution defenders have painted it as the next permutation of Intelligent Design?s grand plans to cram a creation story into science class. So, this is an important victory and only one of the first that can be nearly directly attributed to the outcome of the Dover case. Quotes from the __New York Times__ linkurl:article

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Royal Society seeking 'white knight'

By | February 14, 2006

An urgent plea has gone out from Britain's Royal Society, calling for a ?white knight? to buy some notes written by Robert Hooke in the late 1600s and make them available to researchers. Hooke worked with Robert Boyle, coined the term 'cell' and helped rebuild London, among other things. He was an early secretary of the Royal Society and the papers in question are annotated and draft minutes from early meetings. Given all of which, it seems a shame that the Royal Society isn't in a financial

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This time, the Times may be a little off

By | February 14, 2006

When I saw this month?s linkurl:cover story;http://www.the-scientist.com/2006/2/1/26/1/ earned a mention in Monday?s New York Times article called "Reporters find science journals harder to trust, but not easy to verify," my eyes lingered over both the headline of the story and the writer?s take on our article? namely, that the rocketing rate of submissions to top-tier journals was "weakening the screening process." On the one hand, I see her point. While journals appear to

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Epigenetics in Australia -- and New York

By | February 13, 2006

After 27 years, Australia's Lorne Conference on the Organization and Expression of the Genome witnessed a first on Sunday: a session dedicated to the joys of linkurl:epigenetics;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23011/ . The session kicked off with Carmen Sapienza from the Fels Institute for Cancer Research and Molecule Biology, Temple University School of Medicine, who showed using a combination of database analysis and lab work that imprinted chromosomal regions are historical hot-sp

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James Hansen speaks?and maybe says too much

By | February 13, 2006

Little did I know what a treat I was getting at last week?s linkurl:conference;http://www.socres.org/polsci/agenda.htm at the New School in New York called "Politics & Science: How their interplay results in public policy." On the second day, attendees heard a meticulous synopsis of the scientific data to support the trend of global warming, presented by James Hansen, the now-beleaguered NASA climate scientist who has accused the U.S. government of suppressing his findings. Hansen ? w

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Luging Scientist Slides to Success

By | February 13, 2006

Werner Hoeger, the kinesiologist turned luger we linkurl:profiled;http://www.the-scientist.com/2006/2/1/17/2/ in our February issue, came incredibly close to his goal of four clean runs in Torino this weekend. On Sunday, the Boise State professor completed the final two runs of the two-day event, finishing in 32^nd^ place out of 36. Not bad at all for a 52-year-old, the eldest male luger and one of the eldest competitors at the Winter Games. Hoeger took up the sport only eight years ago and bal

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p53 and the sea

By | February 11, 2006

The 18th Lorne Cancer Conference Erskine on the Beach in Lorne, Australia, closed today, but not before p53 competed with the scenery for scientists' attention. Just as the linkurl:Keystone Symposia;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23090/ are set up to allow for skiing in the afternoon, Lorne is set up to nice long break in the middle of the day during which delegates play tennis on grass courts, swim at the sweeping beach across the road or just laze on the grass in the sun. Tony Brai

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The Tasmanian devil's cancer

By | February 11, 2006

A week or so ago, Ann Maree Pearce, a government cytogeneticist from Australia's island state, Tasmania, and colleagues said in a Nature news report that a nasty facial cancer affecting the Tasmanian devil population, dubbed Devil Facial Tumour Disease, was in fact an infective cell line being passed between the ferocious, foxed-sized scavengers via bites and so on. At the linkurl:18th Lorne Cancer Conference Erskine on the Beach;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23110/ in Lorne, Austra

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