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Sudbo: repeat offender

By | July 3, 2006

It looks like Norwegian researcher Jon Sudbo, who hit the headlines earlier this year for linkurl:fabricating;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/22952/ data for a Lancet paper has been at the data fraud game for quite some time. That?s the conclusion of a report made public on Friday by a commission set up to probe his research career. The commission members found that most of his 38 scientific publications were riddled with manipulation and fabrication of raw data. Even his doctoral dis

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An inspiring hypoxia experiment

By | June 28, 2006

Jane Tomlinson, who is living with advanced breast cancer, starts her grueling 4200 mile, US-spanning bike ride to raise money for cancer research this Friday in San Francisco. According to her linkurl:Website,;http://www.janesappeal.com/ she?s run three London marathons, the NYC marathon, and completed the Ironman triathalon among other extreme exercise fundraisers since she was told nearly six years ago that she had six months to live. She?s been quoted as saying that she expects this to be t

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Hwang heads back to the bench

By | June 28, 2006

The remarkable tale of linkurl:disgraced;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23432/ South Korean researcher Hwang Woo-suk has taken another startling twist. It turns out he?s planning to open his own lab in Seoul next month, using private money to do conduct linkurl:animal cloning;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22746/ and perhaps human embryonic stem cell research. Nobody will need reminding of Hwang?s high-profile woes. Once a national hero, he was forced to leave his post

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More food + no exercise = weight gain. Really?

By | June 28, 2006

From an Endocrine Society linkurl:press release;http://sev.prnewswire.com/health-care-hospitals/20060627/NYTU00827062006-1.html describing a study presented at their national conference this week: 'Our preliminary results indicate that body weight is compromised and weight goes up when people are exposed to an environment with unlimited availability of palatable food and low levels of daily activity,' said University of Chicago researcher Plamen Penev. Stop the presses! Read further, and you

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Cloning ban to stay down under?

By | June 19, 2006

Australian stem cell researchers got some bad news today when newspapers reported that senior ministers in the national government are going to ignore the linkurl:advice;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/23355/ of an independent review that had recommended somatic cell nuclear transfer be permitted for research. That might have been the advice, but at a Cabinet meeting today ministers are expected to retain the status quo. Two of the main figures behind the decision are health minister

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Biodiversity gets its 15 minutes

By | June 15, 2006

Last evening, during Edward O. Wilson?s Baptist sermon-like address to an auditorium of 600 diverse faces at the American Museum of Natural History, the environment and its advocates got a bit of a pep talk. With the eminent naturalist?s signature articulacy, humor, and frankness (take "Soccer moms are the greatest enemy of natural history," or "It might have been a big mistake to give economics a Nobel Prize"), he took on the case for studying and preserving biodiversity. N

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What? There?s news in peer review?

By | June 15, 2006

People linkurl:love to complain;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23061/ about peer review. (The system is too secretive, reviewers nix their competitors? papers, etc.) Still, very little ever changes in peer review, so the same complaints circulate for years with no noticeable effect. So when something potentially system-altering happens, it?s newsworthy. Last week, Nature performed such a service by introducing a linkurl:new feature;http://blogs.nature.com/nature/peerreview/trial/

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Stumping for stem cells

By | June 14, 2006

The linkurl:California stem cell policy and advocacy juggernaut;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/23097/ was in full steam this weekend at Stanford University. The two-day linkurl:Stem Cell Policy and Advocacy Summit II: Empowering the Pro-Cures Coalition;http://www.pro-cures.com offered a banquet of the usual servings, including scientific updates, discussions of linkurl:ethics;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/23251/ and legal issues, and how-to primers on grassroots advocacy.

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Buying your own lab

By | June 9, 2006

Last November, we linkurl:reported;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15837/ that the owners of an upscale spa in New York State had 'offered $10 million to the University of Chicago for the Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wis. ? one of the nation's most historically important, if no longer scientifically advanced, observatories.' Well, they got it. According to a press release this week from the resort firm, Mirbeau will build a 100-room retreat and 73 small homes on the 30 acres

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Babraham appoints Wakelam

By | June 5, 2006

The UK?s Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) linkurl:announced;http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/media/pressreleases/06_06_01_wakelam.html a couple of days ago that it had appointed Michael Wakelam, currently of the University of Birmingham, to be its director as of January 1 next year. Wakelam looks to be a good match for the institute, which conducts research and training in the mechanisms of cell communication and gene regulation. His own area of expertise is cell signaling,

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