Advertisement

The Nutshell

Daily News Roundup

Most Recent

Biodefense watchdog goes dark

By | February 8, 2008

The Sunshine Project, a Texas-based group that has monitored safety and oversight issues in research on bioterror agents, suspended operations on February 1, according to the group's linkurl:Web site.;http://www.sunshine-project.org/ Ed Hammond, who heads the non-profit operation and whom I've spoken with a handful of times, has gained a reputation as something of a pitbull tearing on the pantleg of the US's growing biodefense research program. One of the group's main strategies has been simply

0 Comments

My time at Science: Don Kennedy

By | February 7, 2008

It was the days before the two competing groups of researchers published the first draft of the human genome (released in February, 2001), and Don Kennedy was stressed out. As editor of Science, he was trying to get both groups to publish simultaneously, and in his journal. In the end, he got his first wish, but not his second. "I told somebody that if we had succeeded in that venture it would have made an issue of Science bigger than the Christmas issue of Vogue," he recalled recently.

1 Comment

New direction for gene therapy

By | February 7, 2008

Researchers have identified a new strategy for circumventing the safety problems that have plagued linkurl:gene therapy;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23064/ according to a linkurl:study;http://www.cell.com/content/article/abstract?uid=PIIS0092867408001165 published online in Cell today. The study reports that adenovirus, a common vector for delivering gene therapy, transfects liver cells by a different mechanism than previously thought. That mechanism offers a new target for modi

3 Comments

Ocean thermostat protects corals?

By | February 7, 2008

In a time when all coral news is bad news, a new study that will be published online Saturday in __Geophysical Research Letters__ (read the press release linkurl:here);http://www.ucar.edu/news/releases/2008/coral.jsp suggests that areas of open ocean can act as a natural thermostat, protecting corals from bleaching by preventing surface water temperature from going up. (You can read more about coral bleaching and about the other effects of global warming on the biome in our linkurl:January iss

0 Comments

Alzheimer plaques precede neuron damage

By | February 6, 2008

linkurl:Alzheimer's;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/home/53215/ disease researchers have long tried to address a linkurl:key question:;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/15006/ Do amyloid plaques cause the disease, or do other disease mechanisms come first? A new linkurl:study;http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v451/n7179/abs/nature06616.html published today (February 6) in Nature reports that plaques form immediately before neurite damage, suggesting that amyloids do play a dir

0 Comments

How The New York Times picks reporters

By | February 6, 2008

In a story that probably hit close to home to anyone who ever clicked on the wrong email recipient in Outlook, it turns out that attorneys for Lilly sent confidential documents to a New York Times reporter named Alex Berenson instead of an attorney named Bradford Berenson. Katherine Eban, who has linkurl:written for us;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/home/52963/ about biosecurity, linkurl:reported the story;http://www.portfolio.com/news-markets/top-5/2008/02/05/Eli-Lilly-E-Mail-to-New-York

0 Comments

Lederberg: A thoughtful visionary

By | February 6, 2008

As a young lab leader at the University of Wisconsin in the 1950s, Joshua Lederberg and his first wife linkurl:Esther,;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/37394/ a microbiologist, would invite lab members to their home once a week to discuss significant recent advances in microbial genetics. Lederberg would sit silently on the floor, listening, recalled Gaylen Bradley, who was a postdoc in Lederberg's lab between 1954 and 1956. "Josh would listen, and then at the end make some sort of sen

2 Comments

Shot in the arm for UK funding

By | February 6, 2008

The Wellcome Trust, the UK's largest independent funder of biomedical research, linkurl:announced;http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/doc_WTX043044.html yesterday (Feb 5) that it will increase its spending from about £2.5 billion (roughly 4.9 billion USD) over the last five years to about £4 billion (roughly 7.8 billion USD) over the next five years. The trust said that it will put more money towards large-scale genetic studies, neuroscience research, and new technologies and facilities such

0 Comments

UCLA monkey researcher targeted again

By | February 6, 2008

A fire was set at the home of a University of California, Los Angeles, neuroscientist targeted by animal rights activists in the past. The fire was caused by a device left on the house's front porch on Tuesday (Feb. 5), FBI officials told the linkurl:__Los Angeles Times__.;http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-vandal6feb06,0,1716596.story No one was home at the time the device ignited, and no one was hurt in the fire. UCLA addiction researcher Edythe London owns the house, which was linkurl:

0 Comments

Cat designer declares war

By | February 5, 2008

The less-than-reputable entrepreneur at the helm of a company peddling hypo-allergenic cats is under scrutiny again -- this time for fraudulent "designer cats." But now he's taking the offensive by making allegations against journalists who have covered his company. In January of last year, The Scientist staff writer Kerry Grens investigated a company called Allerca that claimed to have created the world's first hypoallergenic cat. Grens uncovered a string of shady dealings and questionable

1 Comment

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science