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Scientists are criticizing the claim that hominins were in North America more than 100,000 years earlier than the currently accepted estimation.

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image: Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

By | April 27, 2017

A screen of human embryonic stem cell lines finds several that accumulated changes in the gene TP53, including aberrations commonly seen in cancer.

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image: Another New Timeline for <em>Homo naledi</em>

Another New Timeline for Homo naledi

By | April 27, 2017

The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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image: Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

By | April 26, 2017

CLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.

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The resilient rodents switch to fructose metabolism in order to survive for up to 18 minutes in anaerobic conditions.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Trump to Hold Annual Science Fair

Trump to Hold Annual Science Fair

By | April 25, 2017

The president has announced that he will continue the Obama-era tradition of showcasing school children’s science projects at the White House.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

By | April 21, 2017

Scientists predict rodents’ ages by assessing DNA methylation markers in various tissues.

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