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image: Observing the Nuclear Pore

Observing the Nuclear Pore

By | May 2, 2016

Scientists visualize nuclear pore complexes for the first time, using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

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The massive rock that smashed into Earth 66 million years ago killed off many dinosaur species, but the animals were in steady decline for millennia before the cataclysm, researchers report.


image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

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image: Lightning-Fast Spider Bites

Lightning-Fast Spider Bites

By | April 8, 2016

Trap-jaw spiders have the fastest, most powerful bite of any arachnid, scientists show. 


image: Pfizer-Allergan Merger Scrapped

Pfizer-Allergan Merger Scrapped

By | April 7, 2016

A move by the US federal government to close tax loopholes that encourage “tax inversions” likely spooked the companies out of the multibillion dollar deal.


image: Accomplished Biophysicist Dies

Accomplished Biophysicist Dies

By | April 5, 2016

Harold Morowitz, who dedicated his career to investigating the origins of life, has passed away at age 88.


image: New Epigenetic Mark Confirmed in Mammals

New Epigenetic Mark Confirmed in Mammals

By | April 1, 2016

Methylation on adenine bases is involved in the dampening of gene expression in mammalian cells, according to a study.


image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.


image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.


image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.


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