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image: Omnivore Ancestors?

Omnivore Ancestors?

By | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.

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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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image: Cancer Research ROI

Cancer Research ROI

By | June 16, 2014

Report quantifies the returns from the U.K.’s investments in oncology.

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Week in Review: June 9–13

Week in Review: June 9–13

By | June 13, 2014

Ancient apoptotic pathway connects humans to coral; lab-grown, light-sensing retinal tissue; tracking cancer with synthetic phospholipids; diving deep into the lung microbiome

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Top 10 New Species

Top 10 New Species

By | May 23, 2014

The International Institute for Species Exploration announces its picks of novel species discovered in the past year, including a carnivorous mammal, a tiny shrimp, and a fungus.

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image: Week in Review: May 19–23

Week in Review: May 19–23

By | May 23, 2014

Sperm-sex–sensing sows; blocking a pain receptor extends lifespan in mice; stop codons can code for amino acids; exploring the tumor exome

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image: Back from the Blacklist?

Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

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