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image: In Praise of McClintock

In Praise of McClintock

By | February 1, 2017

Robert Martienssen, who studies plant epigenetics at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, discusses the brilliance of pioneering geneticist Barbara McClintock, with whom he worked before her death in 1992.

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image: Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

By | February 1, 2017

Multiple molecular mechanisms keep plant DNA methylation in order.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

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image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: A Studious Survivor

A Studious Survivor

By | April 1, 2016

Meet Lauren Bendesky, the teen who beat neuroblastoma and is now on her way to becoming a pediatric oncologist who treats and studies other kids with cancer.

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image: Death in the Dust

Death in the Dust

By | April 1, 2016

Follow Michele Carbone as he tracks down the genetic and environmental drivers of mesothelioma and other cancers.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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