Multimedia

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Most Recent

image: Kandel on Neuroscience

Kandel on Neuroscience

By | October 1, 2011

Eric Kandel, winner of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for his work on signal transduction in the nervous system, chats about the ever-changing field of neuroscience, funding, his students, and what he hopes science will accomplish.

3 Comments

image: Early Bird Plumage

Early Bird Plumage

By | September 15, 2011

After rummaging through thousands of amber inclusions housed at the University of Alberta and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Canada, researchers discovered 11 amber encased-feather fossils that provide the most detailed picture yet of early feather evolution.

3 Comments

image: <em>Art + Science Now</em>

Art + Science Now

By | September 1, 2011

The book that serves as bio art's encyclopedia.

6 Comments

image: Lost in Space

Lost in Space

By | September 1, 2011

Looking for a more realistic way to study memory, we turned to place cells­­—­a network of cells that record a rat’s memory of an environment. 

0 Comments

image: Molecular Learning

Molecular Learning

By | September 1, 2011

Long-term potentiation (LTP), discovered in the 1970s, was later shown to be the molecular basis of memory. 

0 Comments

image: The Seat of Memory

The Seat of Memory

By | September 1, 2011

Early on, researchers had learned that the hippocampus was the structure in the brain where long-term memories were created and stored, but it was not known whether the different cell types within this structure might be more or less susceptible to the aging process.

0 Comments

image: The Cytokine Cycle

The Cytokine Cycle

By | September 1, 2011

The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.

12 Comments

image: Bug Fest 2011

Bug Fest 2011

By | August 25, 2011

Earlier this month (August 13-14) thousands of children and bug-loving adults descended on the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, where all manner of insect—dead, alive, and deep fried—were on display to be looked at, touched and, yes...eaten.

0 Comments

image: Chasing Grasshoppers

Chasing Grasshoppers

By | August 12, 2011

A conversation with Dan Otte, a South African artist and curator of entomology at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. Otte also happens to have discovered around 20 percent of the cricket species known to date.

6 Comments

image: Haeckel’s Radiolarians

Haeckel’s Radiolarians

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, Prussian naturalist Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859, where, in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the climactic months of his stay glued to his microscope observing and sketching.

18 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  2. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

  3. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  4. Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny
    Daily News Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny

    Out of 25,000 features originally detected by metabolic profiling of E. coli, fewer than 1,000 represent unique metabolites, a study finds.

AAAS