Multimedia

» disease/medicine and techniques

Video, Slideshows, Infographics

Most Recent

image: Atomic Force Microscopy

Atomic Force Microscopy

By | April 2, 2013

The new technique reveals unprecedented details of microscopic life.

0 Comments

image: Networking Medicine

Networking Medicine

By | March 2, 2013

Although fully organized patient-run trials are still few and far between, patients are taking a more active role in clinical research.

0 Comments

image: Game On

Game On

By | January 3, 2013

Check out some of the games being used in serious scientific research, education, and treatment.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

0 Comments

image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

InĀ 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

0 Comments

image: Delivering New Genes

Delivering New Genes

By | June 1, 2012

Gene therapies typically involve the introduction of genetic material into target cells to replace or supplement an existing, usually dysfunctional, gene. 

0 Comments

image: Digging the Underground Life

Digging the Underground Life

By | June 1, 2012

A rare peek inside the subterranean home of the naked mole-rat

0 Comments

image: Messing with HIV

Messing with HIV

By | June 1, 2012

Sangamo Biosciences is putting a different spin on gene therapy. 

0 Comments

image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

image: A Whiff of TB

A Whiff of TB

By | March 1, 2012

Chemical ecologist Max Suckling at the Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., and summer student Rachael Sagar use Pavlovian conditioning to train bees to stick out their tongues, or proboscises, at the scent of odors produced by tuberculosis-causing bacteria.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham