Advertisement

Features

» cancer, clinical trials and immunology

Most Recent

image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

1 Comment

image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

3 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: Tactical Maneuvers

Tactical Maneuvers

By | June 1, 2014

Scientists are creating viruses that naturally home in on tumor cells while simultaneously boosting the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

2 Comments

image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: Worried Sick

Worried Sick

By | July 1, 2013

Expectations can make you ill. Fear can make you fragile. Understanding the nocebo effect may help prevent this painful phenomenon.

3 Comments

image: Why So Soon?

Why So Soon?

By | May 1, 2013

Researchers are using modern experimental tools to probe the mysterious molecular pathways that lead to premature labor and birth.

4 Comments

image: Models of Transparency

Models of Transparency

By , , , and | April 1, 2013

Researchers are taking advantage of small, transparent zebrafish embryos and larvae—and a special strain of see-through adults—to understand the development and spread of cancer.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement