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image: How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Researchers unravel the sophisticated ways cancers evade treatments, including immunotherapies, designed to destroy them.

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image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

1 Comment

image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

5 Comments

image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: A Different Way of Doing Things

A Different Way of Doing Things

By | April 1, 2016

Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolic processes that may serve as promising targets for new therapies.

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image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

4 Comments

image: The Forces of Cancer

The Forces of Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

A tumor’s physical environment fuels its growth and causes treatment resistance.

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image: 2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By and | November 1, 2015

This year’s survey highlights dramatic regional, sector, and gender variations.

13 Comments

image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

2 Comments

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