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image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | December 1, 2013

The causes of a cell’s three-dimensional structure remain a fundamental mystery of cell biology.

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Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

9 Comments

image: The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers are piecing together the devilishly complex sets of genetic alterations underlying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

4 Comments

image: Tuning the Brain

Tuning the Brain

By | October 28, 2013

Deep-brain stimulation is allowing neurosurgeons to adjust the neural activity in specific brain regions to treat thousands of patients with myriad neurological disorders.

3 Comments

image: A Pheromone by Any Other Name

A Pheromone by Any Other Name

By | October 1, 2013

Long known to play a role in sexual attraction, pheromones are revealing their influence over a range of nonsexual behaviors as researchers tease apart the neural circuitry that translates smells into action.

2 Comments

image: Send in the Bots

Send in the Bots

By | October 1, 2013

Animal robots have become a unique tool for studying the behavior of their flesh-and-blood counterparts.

1 Comment

image: Smell and the Degenerating Brain

Smell and the Degenerating Brain

By | October 1, 2013

An impaired sense of smell is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and some other neurodegenerative diseases. Could it be a useful diagnostic tool?

7 Comments

image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

2 Comments

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

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