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image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

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image: Sleep’s Kernel

Sleep’s Kernel

By and | March 1, 2016

Surprisingly small sections of brain, and even neuronal and glial networks in a dish, display many electrical indicators of sleep.

1 Comment

image: Who Sleeps?

Who Sleeps?

By and | March 1, 2016

Once believed to be unique to birds and mammals, sleep is found across the metazoan kingdom. Some animals, it seems, can’t live without it, though no one knows exactly why.

5 Comments

image: Antibody Alternatives

Antibody Alternatives

By and | February 1, 2016

Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.

2 Comments

image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

1 Comment

image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: RNA Epigenetics

RNA Epigenetics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

8 Comments

image: The Evolution of Cooperation

The Evolution of Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

When and why individual organisms work together at the game of life, and what keeps cheaters in check  

18 Comments

image: Viral Soldiers

Viral Soldiers

By | January 1, 2016

Phage therapy to combat bacterial infections is garnering attention for the second time in 100 years, but solid clinical support for its widespread use is still lacking.

11 Comments

image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.

0 Comments

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