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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: Metals on our Mind

Metals on our Mind

By | April 1, 2014

A dramatic loss of copper in key brain regions may be central to Alzheimer’s disease. Could restoring metals in the brain help?

4 Comments

image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

3 Comments

image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  

2 Comments

image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

image: One Man's Trash...

One Man's Trash...

By | December 1, 2013

Scientists who dared to waste their time looking at the midbody, a remnant of cell division, have catapulted the organelle to new prominence.

2 Comments

image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | December 1, 2013

The causes of a cell’s three-dimensional structure remain a fundamental mystery of cell biology.

7 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers are piecing together the devilishly complex sets of genetic alterations underlying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

4 Comments

image: Tuning the Brain

Tuning the Brain

By | October 28, 2013

Deep-brain stimulation is allowing neurosurgeons to adjust the neural activity in specific brain regions to treat thousands of patients with myriad neurological disorders.

2 Comments

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