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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

1 Comment

image: Cellular Rehab

Cellular Rehab

By | December 1, 2015

Physical therapy and exercise are critical to the success of cell therapies approaching the clinic.

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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

2 Comments

image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: My Mighty Mouse

My Mighty Mouse

By | April 1, 2015

Personal drug regimens based on xenograft mice harboring a single patient’s tumor still need to prove their true utility in medicine.

1 Comment

image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

2 Comments

image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

2 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

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