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image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: A Face to Remember

A Face to Remember

By | November 1, 2014

Once dominated by correlational studies, face-perception research is moving into the realm of experimentation—and gaining tremendous insight.

2 Comments

image: Neuroprosthetics

Neuroprosthetics

By , , and | November 1, 2014

Linking the human nervous system to computers is providing unprecedented control of artificial limbs and restoring lost sensory function.

3 Comments

image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

1 Comment

image: Neuroaesthetics

Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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image: Metals on our Mind

Metals on our Mind

By | April 1, 2014

A dramatic loss of copper in key brain regions may be central to Alzheimer’s disease. Could restoring metals in the brain help?

4 Comments

image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

3 Comments

image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  

2 Comments

image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

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