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image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

image: One Man's Trash...

One Man's Trash...

By | December 1, 2013

Scientists who dared to waste their time looking at the midbody, a remnant of cell division, have catapulted the organelle to new prominence.

2 Comments

image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | December 1, 2013

The causes of a cell’s three-dimensional structure remain a fundamental mystery of cell biology.

7 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

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image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

2 Comments

image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

4 Comments

image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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