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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

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image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

2 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2014

Top 10 Innovations 2014

By | December 1, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

8 Comments

image: A Vaulted Mystery

A Vaulted Mystery

By | August 1, 2014

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of tiny barrel-shape structures called vaults, their natural functions remain elusive. Nevertheless, researchers are beginning to put these nanoparticles to work in biomedicine.

1 Comment

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