Special Issue Feature

» disease/medicine and opinion

Most Recent

image: A Not-So-Short Circuit?

A Not-So-Short Circuit?

By | October 1, 2011

As neuroscientists look to the future of their field, they are beginning to delve into more complex factors that define our emotions and intentions.

0 Comments

image: A Small Revolution

A Small Revolution

By | October 1, 2011

In fewer than 15 years, nanomedicine has gone from fantasy to reality.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Research and Debt Reduction

Opinion: Research and Debt Reduction

By | October 1, 2011

Investing more federal dollars in life science research may save the US economy.

12 Comments

image: Opinion: Thinking Outside the Genome

Opinion: Thinking Outside the Genome

By | October 1, 2011

By extending its reach beyond science, the field of omics will change the way we live our lives.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: Miniaturizing Medicine

Opinion: Miniaturizing Medicine

By | October 1, 2011

Nanotechnology will offer doctors new ways to diagnose and treat patients, boosting efficiency and slashing costs.

0 Comments

image: Tinkering With Life

Tinkering With Life

By | October 1, 2011

A decade’s worth of engineering-infused biology

18 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham