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Things That Go Bump

By | March 1, 2016

Scientists still don’t know why animals sleep or how to define the ubiquitous behavior.

2 Comments

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Small Packages

By | August 1, 2014

When proverbs come true

0 Comments

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Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

1 Comment

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Meeting of the Minds

By | July 1, 2012

New changes at The Scientist will ensure that we continue to showcase the best and brightest ideas in the life sciences.

1 Comment

A Truly Happy Return

By | December 1, 2011

After a roller-coaster of an October, The Scientist resumes publication under new ownership.

12 Comments

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Alive and Kicking

By | October 1, 2011

The publication I launched a quarter century ago has come further than anyone ever expected.

27 Comments

image: The “Me Decade” of Cancer

The “Me Decade” of Cancer

By | April 1, 2011

Drugs that target specific tumors are harbingers of a new era of genetically informed medicine.

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Epigenetics and Society

By | March 1, 2011

Did Erasmus Darwin foreshadow the tweaking of his grandson’s paradigm?

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To Err is Human

By | February 1, 2011

This is your brain on emotions.

0 Comments

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