Editorial

» epigenetics, culture, physiology and cancer

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image: Shooting for the Moon

Shooting for the Moon

By | April 1, 2016

Defeating cancer is many times more difficult than planting a flag on our lunar satellite.

4 Comments

image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

1 Comment

image: Weight's the Matter?

Weight's the Matter?

By | November 1, 2015

The causes and consequences of obesity are more complicated than we thought.  

0 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.

0 Comments

image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

0 Comments

image: Search and Destroy

Search and Destroy

By | April 1, 2014

Turning a patient’s immune cells into cancer-fighting weapons

0 Comments

image: Making Cancer More Transparent

Making Cancer More Transparent

By | April 1, 2013

A decade into the age of genomics, science is generating a flood of data that will help in the quest to eradicate the disease.

3 Comments

image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

0 Comments

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