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image: Tricky Trials

Tricky Trials

By | March 1, 2012

Studies on safety, efficacy, or dosing of drugs in children, or on nutritional supplements, are not run-of-the-mill.

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image: On the Menu

On the Menu

By | February 1, 2012

Digestion on the cellular level: two mysteries examined

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image: In with the New

In with the New

By | January 1, 2012

There is definitely no shortage of technological innovation in the life sciences.

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image: A Truly Happy Return

A Truly Happy Return

By | December 1, 2011

After a roller-coaster of an October, The Scientist resumes publication under new ownership.

12 Comments

image: . . . And Many Happy Returns

. . . And Many Happy Returns

By | October 1, 2011

To the great scientific leaps witnessed during our first 25 years, and the game changers yet to come.

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image: Alive and Kicking

Alive and Kicking

By | October 1, 2011

The publication I launched a quarter century ago has come further than anyone ever expected.

27 Comments

image: Hold That Thought

Hold That Thought

By | September 1, 2011

In the memory circuits of the aging brain and the signaling pathways of pain, science is trading mystery for mastery.

15 Comments

image: Seeing the Forest for the Trees

Seeing the Forest for the Trees

By | August 1, 2011

Getting the big picture means asking lots of little questions.

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image: New New Things

New New Things

By | July 1, 2011

Why we love our jobs—there’s never a dull moment.

3 Comments

image: A Shot in the Arm

A Shot in the Arm

By | June 1, 2011

Decades of vaccine research have expanded our understanding of the immune system and are yielding novel disease-fighting tactics.

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