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Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.

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image: With All Due Consideration

With All Due Consideration

By | May 1, 2012

Scientists and their many hats

2 Comments

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Agents Provocateurs

By | April 1, 2012

Asking pointed questions is a key part of the scientific process.

3 Comments

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Tricky Trials

By | March 1, 2012

Studies on safety, efficacy, or dosing of drugs in children, or on nutritional supplements, are not run-of-the-mill.

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On the Menu

By | February 1, 2012

Digestion on the cellular level: two mysteries examined

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image: In with the New

In with the New

By | January 1, 2012

There is definitely no shortage of technological innovation in the life sciences.

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A Truly Happy Return

By | December 1, 2011

After a roller-coaster of an October, The Scientist resumes publication under new ownership.

12 Comments

. . . And Many Happy Returns

By | October 1, 2011

To the great scientific leaps witnessed during our first 25 years, and the game changers yet to come.

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Alive and Kicking

By | October 1, 2011

The publication I launched a quarter century ago has come further than anyone ever expected.

27 Comments

image: Hold That Thought

Hold That Thought

By | September 1, 2011

In the memory circuits of the aging brain and the signaling pathways of pain, science is trading mystery for mastery.

15 Comments

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