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image: Seeing the Forest for the Trees

Seeing the Forest for the Trees

By | August 1, 2011

Getting the big picture means asking lots of little questions.

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image: New New Things

New New Things

By | July 1, 2011

Why we love our jobs—there’s never a dull moment.

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image: A Shot in the Arm

A Shot in the Arm

By | June 1, 2011

Decades of vaccine research have expanded our understanding of the immune system and are yielding novel disease-fighting tactics.

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image: Channeling the Microbiome

Channeling the Microbiome

By | May 25, 2011

The new discipline of sociomicrobiology is revealing life’s struggle tooth and nail—and gut.

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image: The “Me Decade” of Cancer

The “Me Decade” of Cancer

By | April 1, 2011

Drugs that target specific tumors are harbingers of a new era of genetically informed medicine.

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image: Epigenetics and Society

Epigenetics and Society

By | March 1, 2011

Did Erasmus Darwin foreshadow the tweaking of his grandson’s paradigm?

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image: To Err is Human

To Err is Human

By | February 1, 2011

This is your brain on emotions.

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Mail

By | February 1, 2011

The Evidence Argument   Re: about the use of evidence in medicine: “Evidence-based” is a simplistic and misleading buzzword. A single well-documented case is valid evidence, but the self-proclaimed “evidence-based” promoters and practitioners attack it as “anecdotal.”

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image: Brave New Drugs

Brave New Drugs

By | January 1, 2011

Intoxicating ideas for saving a billion lives

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