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» behavior, neuroscience and ecology

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Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

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Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

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Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

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An Ear for Home

By | April 1, 2013

Pigeons may use ultra-low-frequency sounds to navigate—a strategy that could steer them off course in the face of infrasonic disturbances, such as sonic booms.

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Speed-Sensitive Denticles

By | April 1, 2013

Tooth-like structures on the skin of a South American fish might serve as high-velocity water-flow detectors.

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Decoding Dreams

By | January 1, 2013

Researchers learn to predict visual imagery in dreams based on functional MRI scans of brain activity during sleep.

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A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

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Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

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Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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