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» behavior, neuroscience and evolution

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image: Seeds of Hopelessness

Seeds of Hopelessness

By | August 1, 2014

Can seed banks adequately prepare for the future if wild plant populations are already lagging behind in adapting to rapid climate change?

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image: Sex and Drugs

Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

image: The Love Bug

The Love Bug

By | July 1, 2014

A mysterious iridovirus outbreak in a lab colony of crickets reveals the virus’s ability to spur increased sexual activity.

1 Comment

image: The Crowd Takes On the Computer

The Crowd Takes On the Computer

By | May 1, 2014

Gangs of nonexperts are outperforming science’s best efforts at automating biological problem solving.

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

2 Comments

image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

3 Comments

image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

1 Comment

image: Evolution Takes a Road Trip

Evolution Takes a Road Trip

By | June 1, 2013

Highways and byways are among the man-made environmental alterations driving the evolution of animals on contemporary timescales, with implications for ecology.

3 Comments

image: An Ear for Home

An Ear for Home

By | April 1, 2013

Pigeons may use ultra-low-frequency sounds to navigate—a strategy that could steer them off course in the face of infrasonic disturbances, such as sonic booms.

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image: Speed-Sensitive Denticles

Speed-Sensitive Denticles

By | April 1, 2013

Tooth-like structures on the skin of a South American fish might serve as high-velocity water-flow detectors.

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