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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

3 Comments

A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Serious Putty

Serious Putty

By | May 1, 2016

A naturally occurring clay, used in traditional Native American medicine, shows promise as an antibiotic.

6 Comments

image: TB over Time

TB over Time

By | August 1, 2015

Eighteenth-century DNA sequences yield insights into the history of tuberculosis infections.

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image: A Plague on Pachyderms

A Plague on Pachyderms

By | June 1, 2015

At least seven species of herpesvirus commonly infect elephants. At zoos, keepers scramble to save calves, who are particularly vulnerable to the viruses.

5 Comments

image: HIV in the Internet Age

HIV in the Internet Age

By | May 1, 2015

Social networking sites may facilitate the spread of sexually transmitted disease, but these sites also serve as effective education and prevention tools.

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Miraculous Activist

Miraculous Activist

By | May 1, 2015

Timothy Ray Brown, commonly referred to as the “Berlin patient,” does not want to be the only person cured of AIDS.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: Seal Stowaways

Seal Stowaways

By | November 1, 2014

Pathogen traces recovered from Peruvian mummies suggest tuberculosis-causing bacteria rode from Africa to South America in pinnipeds.

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