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image: The Spleen Collectors

The Spleen Collectors

By | August 1, 2015

Donated organs are helping researchers map out the immune system in humans.


image: Cancer Kismet

Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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image: Smoke Detectors

Smoke Detectors

By | August 1, 2013

Ancient receptors in seeds bind a small molecule in smoke that promotes germination.

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image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.


image: 3-D Printing

3-D Printing

By | July 1, 2012

Is printing out your own lab equipment, molecular models, and drug compounds the wave of the future?


image: Sweet and Sour Science

Sweet and Sour Science

By | February 1, 2012

Japanese researchers unravel the mystery of miracle fruit.


image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.


image: Marauding Moths

Marauding Moths

By | October 1, 2011

Dried plant specimens reveal the origin of an insect pest that has spread throughout Europe.


image: String Theory

String Theory

By | August 1, 2011

New types of biological filaments are turning up in yeast, fly, bacterial cells and in rat neurons, and they may yield clues to how the cytoskeleton evolved from metabolically active enzymes.


image: Cellular Salve

Cellular Salve

By | July 8, 2011

Ivan Martin talks about the promise of using cell-based therapies to regenerate joint cartilage.


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