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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Neurometabolic Disorders Could Contribute to Depression

Neurometabolic Disorders Could Contribute to Depression

By | November 1, 2016

Impairments in the production of neurotransmitters may lead to depression in some patients, preliminary results show, opening new avenues for research.

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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The simple therapy likely exploits the neural plasticity of the olfactory system.

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image: Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

By | September 1, 2016

Neuropsychologist Simon Thompson found a possible link between yawning and multiple sclerosis. So what better way to get under the skin of his research than volunteering to take part in one of his experiments?

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image: Do Schizophrenic Brains Repair Themselves?

Do Schizophrenic Brains Repair Themselves?

By | August 1, 2016

Preliminary research suggests that the brains of schizophrenia patients may regain tissue mass as the illness wears on.

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Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

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