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Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: A New Breed

A New Breed

By | December 1, 2014

Genomics and advanced reproductive technologies have turned cattle breeding into a whole new animal.

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Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

1 Comment

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Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

image: Waste Not, Want Not

Waste Not, Want Not

By | June 1, 2014

Researchers and entrepreneurs divert food waste from landfills by turning it into a variety of ingenious products.

2 Comments

image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

1 Comment

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Getting Down to Business

By | April 1, 2014

Is there a genetic component to entrepreneurial success?

2 Comments

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