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Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Centennial <em>Shigella</em>

Centennial Shigella

By | February 1, 2015

A strain of the dysentery-causing bacterium isolated in 1915 tells the story of a young soldier who died of the disease in the early days of World War I.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: A New Breed

A New Breed

By | December 1, 2014

Genomics and advanced reproductive technologies have turned cattle breeding into a whole new animal.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

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Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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