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image: A Most Kinky Moth

A Most Kinky Moth

By | May 1, 2015

A retired entomologist discovers a world of behavioral diversity in the courtship rituals of a well-studied moth species.

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image: HIV in the Internet Age

HIV in the Internet Age

By | May 1, 2015

Social networking sites may facilitate the spread of sexually transmitted disease, but these sites also serve as effective education and prevention tools.

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Miraculous Activist

Miraculous Activist

By | May 1, 2015

Timothy Ray Brown, commonly referred to as the “Berlin patient,” does not want to be the only person cured of AIDS.

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image: Cancer Kismet

Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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image: Mining the Outliers

Mining the Outliers

By | April 1, 2015

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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image: Beneficial Stats

Beneficial Stats

By | March 1, 2015

Statisticians who normally crunch numbers to forecast trends in the food-service industry turn their attention to bettering treatment of ALS.

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