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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Fluke Forces

Fluke Forces

By | April 1, 2014

Dolphins prove that they rely on muscle power, rather than a trick of fluid dynamics, to race through water at high speeds.

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image: Getting Down to Business

Getting Down to Business

By | April 1, 2014

Is there a genetic component to entrepreneurial success?

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image: Have Herpes, Will Travel

Have Herpes, Will Travel

By | April 1, 2014

Insight into the geographical clustering of a viral genome comes from an unexpected source.

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image: Air Traffic

Air Traffic

By | March 1, 2014

Scientists use DNA sequencing to identify what’s attracting birds to airports, where midair collisions with planes can be devastating.

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image: Jaws, Reconsidered

Jaws, Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2014

Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction.

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image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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image: Feeling Is Believing

Feeling Is Believing

By | February 1, 2014

Many people can “see” their hands in complete darkness, absent any visual stimulus, due to kinesthetic feedback from their own movements.

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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