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image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?

3 Comments

image: Heady Stuff

Heady Stuff

By | November 1, 2015

New research on how fat influences brain neuronal activity

1 Comment

image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

2 Comments

image: The 6,000-Calorie Diet

The 6,000-Calorie Diet

By | November 1, 2015

Overeating and inactivity lead to insulin resistance in just days—and oxidative stress is to blame.

2 Comments

image: Formaldehyde Fears

Formaldehyde Fears

By | October 1, 2015

Data on the links between ALS and the chemical have been contradictory, but the latest study suggests undertakers are at risk.

1 Comment

image: Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

By | October 1, 2015

The long-sought genetic link between handedness and language lateralization patterns in the brain is turning out to be illusory.

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image: Ocean Sentinels

Ocean Sentinels

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers are struggling to understand shifts in the migratory patterns of penguins in the Southwest Atlantic.

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image: Whistle While You Work Your Brain

Whistle While You Work Your Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Communication based on whistles offers a “natural experiment” for studying how the brain processes language.

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image: Handicapable

Handicapable

By | September 1, 2015

Meet Tilak Ratnanather, the deaf biomedical engineer who mentors hard-of-hearing students headed for STEM careers.

1 Comment

image: Lending an Ear

Lending an Ear

By | September 1, 2015

Until recently, auditory brainstem implants have been restricted to patients with tumors on their auditory nerves.

0 Comments

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