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By | November 1, 2012

Comparing the protein profile of a 500-year-old Inca mummy to modern humans reveals an active lung infection prior to sacrifice.  

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Death Match

By | October 1, 2012

Cockfighting and other cultural practices in Southeast Asia could greatly aid the spread of deadly diseases like bird flu.

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Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."


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Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.


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Killer Silk

By | July 1, 2012

Silk impregnated with bleach may provide a new way to fight the formidable spores of the anthrax bacterium.


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It’s Raining Mice

By | May 1, 2012

A new brown tree snake control strategy takes to the skies as scientists scatter toxic rodents over Guam’s forest canopy.


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Genghis Jon

By | February 1, 2012

By helping Mongolians cultivate an understanding of their native insect fauna, scientists hope to protect the country's unique yet fragile ecosystems.

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Evolution, Tout de Suite

By | October 1, 2011

Epigenetic perturbations could jump-start heritable variation.


image: Gorilla Warfare

Gorilla Warfare

By | October 1, 2011

As ecotourism becomes more popular, wild apes are succumbing to human diseases.


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    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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