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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

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image: Tenacious Termites

Tenacious Termites

By | February 1, 2014

Formosan subterranean termites evade deadly pathogens by building nests lined with their own feces.

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image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.

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image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

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image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

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image: Trouble in the Heartland

Trouble in the Heartland

By | October 1, 2013

A new tick-borne disease has emerged in the US Midwest—and the culprit is not a bacterium. 

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image: Evolution Takes a Road Trip

Evolution Takes a Road Trip

By | June 1, 2013

Highways and byways are among the man-made environmental alterations driving the evolution of animals on contemporary timescales, with implications for ecology.

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